1 of 29 DOCUMENTS

Former Chiefs player Bam Morris sentenced to 30 months in prison

By MATT CAMPBELL - The Kansas City Star
Date: 06/28/01 22:15

Former Chiefs running back Bam Morris was sentenced Thursday to 30 months in prison for drug trafficking and money laundering in a case involving another former player while both were on the team.

Morris, whose financial fortunes have ranged from earning a career high of $1.3 million to running a bank overdraft of $30,000, also was ordered by U.S. District Judge Howard F. Sachs to pay the minimum fine of $10,000.

Shackled in a wheelchair with a bandaged left foot from an unexplained injury, Morris, 29, apologized for actions that ruined his professional football career.

"First of all," Morris said, "I want to tell my family and friends that I'm sorry. I was wrong. I made a mistake. I ask the court to be lenient."

Under the penalty guidelines for the crimes to which Morris pleaded guilty, he could have been sentenced to 60 years and a fine of $2.5 million.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver made the unusual request that the minimum penalty guideline of five years, or 60 months, be cut in half because Morris is cooperating with the government and "has provided substantial assistance" in ongoing criminal cases.

Defense attorney William Rork said Morris was remorseful.

"He recognizes he was one of few people that make it, with their talent, to rise in the National Football League," Rork said. "It had given him a chance that others only dream about."

Sachs said he concurred with the request for a sentence below the minimum guidelines based on testimony about Morris's cooperation in other cases. He heard about that cooperation in a closed session just before Thursday's sentencing.

Morris probably will receive time off for the 15 months he already has served in prison. Sachs agreed to recommend that Morris serve his term at the medium-security federal prison camp in Leavenworth.

Once released, however, Morris faces a probation violation charge stemming from a separate state drug case in Texas. Those charges stem from a $35,000 marijuana purchase Morris arranged in Texas in 1999 using money he received from former Chiefs kickoff receiver Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover was sentenced in November to four months on a federal car-theft charge. Despite admitting that he financed the drug deal with Morris, he was allowed to plead to the lesser charge.

Gregory E. Burns, a friend and personal assistant of Vanover who was sentenced last month to 10 years on a cocaine charge, cooperated with federal drug investigators along with Vanover and gave them information that led to Morris.

Most of the 90-minute sentencing hearing for Morris centered on the amount of the fine, if any, that should be imposed.

A probation office report recommended that Morris should be considered without assets and Oliver concurred. But Sachs was skeptical.

Oliver called to the stand a special investigator of organized crime and drug trafficking for the IRS who had examined Morris' financial records.

Special Agent Robert Hawkins described the wildly swinging fortunes of a young football player who made large sums of money in the NFL from 1994 to 2000, but never invested any of it and never bought any property.

Hawkins said the peak for Morris was his last year with the Ravens, when he grossed $1.3 million. The nadir was in March 1999 when, having just been re-signed by the Chiefs, he was overdrawn by $30,171 from his checking account at NationsBank.

Morris, who also played for the Chicago Bears and the Pittsburgh Steelers, was on the Chiefs' roster from October 1998 until he was released in February 2000.

Hawkins testified that Morris' salary from the Chiefs was about $200,000 in 1998, of which he netted about $125,000. In 1999 he grossed about $500,000, of which he netted about $300,000.

Hawkins said football players typically are paid weekly from September to December and receive nothing the rest of the year, except possibly a roster bonus in March if they are re-signed for another season.

He said football players typically loan money in the off-season to colleagues who are making less and borrow from those who are making more, creating vast fluctuations in their assets.

But Morris may have had more difficulty than most. He had prior debts from his pre-Chiefs days that included car and rent payments and failure to pay a caterer for services at a charity event.

He was behind in rent payments on his Overland Park home, delinquent on his Visa card account, behind in payments on a bank loan and in payments for his Ford Explorer and his wife's Mercedes.

While overdrawn more than $30,000 in March 1999, Morris received a $30,000 roster bonus from the Chiefs. He deposited it, but the teller gave him $8,000 back in cash and Morris wrote checks on the rest of the deposit. The bank stopped payment on the checks.

About that time, Hawkins testified, Morris received a $70,000 check from Vanover. He deposited $68,000 of it into his account, but drew a $35,000 cashier's check to send to an accomplice in Texas to buy marijuana for Vanover. That transaction was the basis for the drug trafficking and money laundering charges.

The Chiefs became aware of Morris's financial situation from his creditors. The team advanced Morris $64,705 in May 1999 from his fall salary. But the check was made out to the bank, which paid the creditors and gave Morris a modest amount for him and his wife to live on until the football season.

"What did he do with all the money he earned?" Oliver asked Hawkins.

"He spent it," the IRS agent replied.

Rork told Sachs that a fine would be counterproductive, considering Morris' debts.

The presentence probation report noted that Morris thinks he could once again play professional football. But Oliver said that was an unreasonable expectation given that Morris faces more legal issues in Texas.

"It is hard to gauge what the defendant's financial future is and his ability to earn money in professional sports," Sachs said in imposing the minimum fine of $10,000. "I'm just not comfortable in writing that (fine) off."

Copyright 2000 Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service
Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service

The Kansas City Star

August 15, 2000, Tuesday

SECTION: SPORTS

KR-ACC-NO: K5446

LENGTH: 991 words

HEADLINE: Pleas by Bam Morris not the final chapter in drug investigation

BYLINE: By Mark Morris

BODY:

KANSAS CITY, Mo. _ Former Kansas City Chiefs running back Bam Morris' guilty pleas to marijuana trafficking and money laundering charges Monday include a provision that he cooperate with federal authorities in their ongoing drug investigation in the Kansas City area.

Investigative records reviewed by The Kansas City Star revealed that at least two other former members of the Chiefs also could come under federal scrutiny.

Neither of those players has been charged in the case, nor did they appear on the prosecution's list of witnesses for Morris' trial, which was canceled after he pleaded guilty Monday morning.

Those witnesses included Kimble Anders, Victor Riley, Eric Warfield _ all currently playing with the Chiefs _ and Joe Horn of the New Orleans Saints.

Also scheduled to testify were the Chiefs' director of player personnel, Lamonte Winston, and former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover. Earlier this year Vanover pleaded guilty to federal stolen-car charges and agreed to cooperate with authorities. He is awaiting sentencing.

Morris pleaded guilty Monday to joining Vanover in a marijuana-smuggling scheme in the spring of 1999. Morris, 28, acknowledged working with Vanover, former college friend Dewayne Calvin Bryant and Robert Corey Myers to transport the marijuana from Texas to Kansas City.

Bryant and Myers pleaded guilty earlier this month to drug trafficking and money laundering and agreed to cooperate with investigators. They are awaiting sentencing.

According to preliminary estimates in his plea agreement, Morris could face as many as 63 months in federal prison because of his Kansas City convictions.

His guilty pleas also could trigger a probation violation for a previous drug conviction in Texas, where authorities have said he could face as many as 10 more years in prison.

Morris' lawyer, William Rork of Topeka, Kan., said he was confident Morris could help prosecutors in their investigation.

"If I was a betting man, I'd say it would lead to other people," Rork said.

U.S. Attorney Stephen L. Hill Jr. on Monday declined to discuss future targets of his probe, but he noted that it was continuing.

"It's an ongoing investigation, and Mr. Morris' plea agreement speaks to that," Hill said.

Because Morris has not begun cooperating with investigators, the extent of his knowledge of further drug trafficking is unclear. Evidence of other possible directions, however, appeared recently in investigative records reviewed by The Star.

In federal grand jury testimony earlier this year, a prisoner acknowledged selling the designer drug Ecstasy at nightclubs, strip bars and "rave" parties. In that capacity, the prisoner said, he funneled drugs to a former member of the Chiefs.

In interviews with FBI agents earlier this year, two other witnesses identified the same former Chiefs player as a "heavy user of cocaine" known to possess and distribute drugs.

One of those witnesses, a woman, also identified another former Chiefs player as a "heavy cocaine user."

"She believed he obtained cocaine for distribution from an unknown source in Atlanta, Ga.," FBI agents reported after an April 27 interview.

And at least twice the name of a current NBA player has appeared in FBI reports.

In one instance a witness described the player as a "good friend" of Vanover's friend and personal assistant, Gregory Burns, who also has pleaded guilty to drug trafficking charges and is cooperating with authorities.

FBI agents, however, were careful to note: "(The witness) is not aware if Burns has provided any cocaine or marijuana to (the NBA player) for distribution among any (basketball) players...."

In their investigation, prosecutors turned up a cocaine transaction that previously had not been publicly disclosed but was alluded to by Rork in a press conference after Morris' guilty plea.

"Vanover and Burns were involved in the distribution of drugs long before Bam Morris" got involved, Rork said.

In testimony before a federal grand jury Feb. 25, Vanover acknowledged that in the middle of the 1998 Chiefs season he contributed $8,000 toward the purchase of cocaine Burns bought in Miami for $24,000.

According to Vanover's testimony, Burns returned with 2.2 pounds of cocaine, which he sold in Kansas City without making a profit.

"Why was it that you gave Greg Burns $8,000 to get some cocaine?" an assistant U.S. attorney asked Vanover.

"He just said he needed it," Vanover replied. "He didn't have the whole amount."

"Is it correct to say you did it to him as a favor?"

"Yes, sir," Vanover said.

In plea agreements for Vanover and Burns, prosecutors agreed "not to file any additional charges...arising out of the present offenses or investigation in the Western District of Missouri."

Michael Yonke, Vanover's lawyer, declined to discuss the cocaine transaction but issued a prepared statement.

"While Tamarick Vanover was prepared to testify on behalf of the government, pursuant to his plea agreement, he is relieved this matter has been resolved without a long trial," Yonke said. "I find it unfortunate that while Bam Morris pleaded guilty today, his attorney continues to attack Tamarick Vanover. Mr. Vanover has accepted his responsibility from the outset of these matters, and Bam Morris should do the same."

Morris, who remained in federal custody, retired from pro football in late January, ending a troubled NFL career. He was acquired by the Chiefs in a trade with Chicago in 1998.

Morris' career was marred by two four-game suspensions at the beginning of the 1996 and the 1997 seasons for violating the NFL substance-abuse policy. He spent three months in a Texas prison in 1998 after he missed a probation hearing. At that point he was released by the Baltimore Ravens and subsequently signed as a free agent by Chicago.

(c) 2000, The Kansas City Star.

Visit The Star Web edition on the World Wide Web at http://www.kcstar.com/

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

JOURNAL-CODE: KC

LOAD-DATE: August 15, 2000


2 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service
Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service

The Kansas City Star

August 15, 2000, Tuesday

SECTION: SPORTS

KR-ACC-NO: K5337

LENGTH: 289 words

HEADLINE: Former Chief pleads guilty in marijuana smuggling scheme

BYLINE: By Mark Morris

BODY:

KANSAS CITY, Mo. _ Former Kansas City Chiefs running back Bam Morris pleaded guilty Monday, on the morning his trial was to begin, to joining a former teammate in a $40,000 marijuana smuggling scheme in 1999.

Morris, 28, acknowledged working with former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover, former college friend Dewayne Calvin Bryant and Robert Corey Myers of Warrensburg to transport the marijuana from Texas to Kansas City.

Vanover already has pleaded guilty to federal stolen car charges, while Bryant and Myers confessed to their roles in the marijuana conspiracy earlier this month.

According to Morris' plea agreement, he has agreed to cooperate with prosecutors in an ongoing investigation. Preliminary estimates in the plea agreement says he could face as many as 63 months in federal prison because of his convictions in Kansas City.

His guilty plea also triggers a probation violation for a previous drug conviction in the state of Texas, where authorities have said he could face as much as 10 more years in prison.

Morris' lawyer, William Rork of Topeka, Kan., said the possibility of an even higher federal sentence had Morris lost at trial was a factor in his client's decision to plead guilty.

"I'd rather have gone to trial, but I didn't have to serve the time," Rork said.

U.S. Attorney Stephen L. Hill Jr., said Morris' guilty pleas should serve as a lesson to young people.

"This is a statement that rules apply to everybody," Hill said. "No matter how fast you can run, no matter how good a football player you are, the rules apply to you. I hope kids everywhere get that message."

(c) 2000, The Kansas City Star.

Visit The Star Web edition on the World Wide Web at http://www.kcstar.com/

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

JOURNAL-CODE: KC

LOAD-DATE: August 15, 2000


3 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 The Kansas City Star Co.

THE KANSAS CITY STAR

August 15, 2000, Tuesday METROPOLITAN EDITION

SECTION: NATIONAL; Pg. A1

LENGTH: 1005 words

HEADLINE: Ex-Chief's plea involves cooperation;
Other former players might be investigated in drug case

BYLINE: MARK MORRIS; The Kansas City Star

BODY:

Former Chiefs running back Bam Morris' guilty pleas to marijuana
trafficking and money laundering charges Monday include a provision
that he cooperate with federal authorities in their ongoing drug
investigation in the Kansas City area.

Investigative records reviewed by The Kansas City Star revealed
that at least two other former members of the Chiefs also could come
under federal scrutiny.

Neither of those players had been charged in the case, nor did
they appear on the prosecution's list of witnesses for Morris' trial,
which was canceled after he pleaded guilty Monday morning.

Those witnesses included Kimble Anders, Victor Riley, Eric
Warfield - all currently playing with the Chiefs - and Joe Horn of
the New Orleans Saints.

Also scheduled to testify were the Chiefs' director of player
personnel, Lamonte Winston, and former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick
Vanover. Earlier this year Vanover pleaded guilty to federal
stolen-car charges and agreed to cooperate with authorities. He is
awaiting sentencing.

Morris pleaded guilty Monday to joining Vanover in a
marijuana-smuggling scheme in the spring of 1999. Morris, 28,
acknowledged working with Vanover, former college friend Dewayne
Calvin Bryant and Robert Corey Myers of Warrensburg, Mo., to
transport the marijuana from Texas to Kansas City.

Bryant and Myers pleaded guilty earlier this month to drug
trafficking and money laundering and agreed to cooperate with
investigators. They are awaiting sentencing.

According to preliminary estimates in his plea agreement, Morris
could face as many as 63 months in federal prison because of his
Kansas City convictions.

His guilty pleas also could trigger a probation violation for a
previous drug conviction in Texas, where authorities have said he
could face as many as 10 more years in prison.

Morris' lawyer, William Rork of Topeka, said he was confident
Morris could help prosecutors in their investigation. "If I was a
betting man, I'd say it would lead to other people," Rork said.

U.S. Attorney Stephen L. Hill Jr. on Monday declined to discuss
future targets of his probe, but he noted that it was continuing.

"It's an ongoing investigation, and Mr. Morris' plea agreement
speaks to that," Hill said.

Because Morris has not begun cooperating with investigators, the
extent of his knowledge of further drug trafficking is unclear.
Evidence of other possible directions, however, appeared recently in
investigative records reviewed by The Star.

In federal grand jury testimony earlier this year, a prisoner
acknowledged selling the designer drug Ecstasy at nightclubs, strip
bars and "rave" parties. In that capacity, the prisoner said, he
funneled drugs to a former member of the Chiefs.

In interviews with FBI agents earlier this year, two other
witnesses identified the same former Chiefs player as a "heavy user
of cocaine" known to possess and distribute drugs.

One of those witnesses, a woman, also identified another former
Chiefs player as a "heavy cocaine user."

"She believed he obtained cocaine for distribution from an
unknown source in Atlanta, Ga.," FBI agents reported after an April
27 interview.

And at least twice the name of a current NBA player has appeared
in FBI reports.

In one instance a witness described the player as a "good
friend" of Vanover's friend and personal assistant, Gregory Burns,
who also has pleaded guilty to drug trafficking charges and is
cooperating with authorities.

FBI agents, however, were careful to note: "(The witness) is not
aware if Burns has provided any cocaine or marijuana to (the NBA
player) for distribution among any (basketball) players. ... "

In their investigation, prosecutors turned up a cocaine
transaction that previously had not been publicly disclosed but was
alluded to by Rork in a press conference after Morris' guilty plea.

"Vanover and Burns were involved in the distribution of drugs
long before Bam Morris" got involved, Rork said.

In testimony before a federal grand jury Feb. 25, Vanover
acknowledged that in the middle of the 1998 Chiefs season he
contributed $8,000 toward the purchase of cocaine Burns bought in
Miami for $24,000.

According to Vanover's testimony, Burns returned with 2.2 pounds
of cocaine, which he sold in Kansas City without making a profit.

"Why was it that you gave Greg Burns $8,000 to get some
cocaine?" an assistant U.S. attorney asked Vanover.

"He just said he needed it," Vanover replied. "He didn't have
the whole amount."

"Is it correct to say you did it to him as a favor?"

"Yes, sir," Vanover said.

In plea agreements for Vanover and Burns, prosecutors agreed
"not to file any additional charges ... arising out of the present
offenses or investigation in the Western District of Missouri."

Michael Yonke, Vanover's lawyer, declined to discuss the cocaine
transaction but issued a prepared statement. "While Tamarick
Van-over was prepared to testify on behalf of the government,
pursuant to his plea agreement, he is relieved this matter has been
resolved without a long trial," Yonke said. "I find it unfortunate
that while Bam Morris pleaded guilty today, his attorney continues to
attack Tamarick Vanover. Mr. Vanover has accepted his responsibility
from the outset of these matters, and Bam Morris should do the
same."

Morris, who remained in federal custody, retired from pro
football in January, ending a troubled NFL career. He was acquired by
the Chiefs in a trade with Chicago in 1998.

Morris' career was marred by two four-game suspensions at the
beginning of the 1996 and the 1997 seasons for violating the NFL
substance-abuse policy. He spent three months in a Texas prison in
1998 after he missed a probation hearing. At that point he was
released by the Baltimore Ravens and subsequently signed as a free
agent by Chicago.
@ART CAPTION:Morris
@ART:Photo (color)

LOAD-DATE: August 15, 2000


4 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

August 7, 2000, Monday, BC cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 542 words

HEADLINE: Chiefs: Witness list does not indicate other players involved

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

The attorney for former Chiefs running back Bam Morris says his client will not enter a plea agreement in his upcoming federal drug trial, even though two co-defendants pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against Morris.

"We're going to trial Aug. 14, definitely," lawyer William Rork said after the plea agreements were announced Friday.

Morris, 28, who retired abruptly after last season, faces trial on charges he and two other men operated a marijuana distribution ring allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

His two co-defendants, DeWayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 23, of Warrensburg, Mo., each pleaded guilty Friday to one count of conspiracy to distribute 100 grams or more of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Bryant admitted to obtaining marijuana in Texas and conspiring with Morris and Myers to distribute it in the Kansas City area. Myers also admitted to being part of the conspiracy and distributing marijuana in the Warrensburg and Columbia area.

The two men also agreed to testify against Morris, as has Vanover.

Five current or former Chiefs players and one team official are on a witness list to testify against Morris. The players are Vanover, Kimble Anders, Victor Riley, Eric Warfield and Joe Horn, who is now with the New Orleans Saints. Lamonte Winston, the Chiefs' director of player development, also is on the list.

All but Winston declined to comment Friday. Winston said he had no idea why he was on the list.

"I'm blindsided," Winston said. "This is news to me. Now you've got me trying to find out what's going on."

Chiefs president and general manager Carl Peterson said Friday that prosecutors are not alleging that any of the potential witnesses were involved in the drug ring.

"We have been in discussions with the FBI ever since Bam Morris was charged," Peterson said in a written statement. "At no point during those discussions has the FBI ever indicated that it believes any other person with the Kansas City Chiefs is involved."

The fact that someone is on a witness list doesn't mean they were involved in the ring or witnessed anything illegal, said Kansas City defense attorney Chris Harlan.

"They may be there to provide background information, and they may not testify at all," he said.

Friday's court filings also answered the lingering question of why Vanover would try to supplement his substantial NFL salary by financing a marijuana ring.

"Mr. Vanover owed the IRS a great deal of money," Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said at a court hearing. "Mr. Vanover expressed an interest in getting involved in a drug transaction in order to pay his debt."

Oliver said that immediately after receiving a $313,000 bonus from the Chiefs in 1999, Vanover began funneling money to Morris to finance the ring.

Vanover, who pleaded guilty to federal car-theft charges earlier this year, is expected to testify about $40,000 he allegedly gave to Morris to operate a marijuana-smuggling ring in the spring of 1999.

Gregory E. Burns, Vanover's friend and personal assistant, has pleaded guilty to helping Morris operate the ring, and is also scheduled to testify against him.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: August 8, 2000


5 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Inc.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

August 6, 2000, Sunday, EARLY FIVE STAR EDITION

SECTION: SPORTS, Pg. D6

LENGTH: 550 words

HEADLINE: AFTER UNDERGOING SURGERY, FIELDER IS LOST TO DOLPHINS FOR A MONTH

BYLINE: From News Services

BODY:

Jay Fiedler woke up Friday morning and told his agent he felt no pain in his body "for the first time in months."

Fiedler underwent surgery Thursday evening to repair a labral tear in his right hip joint. Doctors told him he would miss a month, meaning he would likely be out the entire preseason.

Dolphins coach Dave Wannstedt confirmed in a statement that Fiedler was feeling no pain. Fiedler was scheduled to go home by Friday evening or early today.

"I talked to him this morning and he said he felt great," agent Brian Levy said. "He told me that for the first time in months, he didn't feel any pain anywhere."

Fiedler was in the midst of a tight race with Damon Huard for the Dolphins' starting quarterback job until the need for the surgery was discovered Thursday morning.

Fiedler had been running second to Huard in that battle, playing with a battery of aches and pains - some apparently resulting from the hip-joint injury.

"He's been competing basically on one leg," Levy said.

Levy said doctors' news that Fiedler would miss four weeks is a "conservative" estimate. "Jay's thinking he'll be able to play against New Orleans Aug. 25," Levy said.

In his absence, Jim Druckenmiller expects to show his abilities.

"It sounds like I'm going to play most of the second half against Pittsburgh," Druckenmiller said. "I hate for something to happen to anyone ... but at the same time, it's my chance to perform and I have to take advantage."

Jamal Lewis, the Baltimore Ravens' top draft pick, did his first running since injuring his elbow in the July 28 scrimmage against the Washington Redskins.

The attorney for former Chiefs running back Bam Morris says his client will not enter a plea agreement in his upcoming federal drug trial, even though two co-defendants pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against Morris.

"We're going to trial Aug. 14, definitely," lawyer William Rork said after the plea agreements were announced Friday.

Morris, 28, who retired abruptly after last season, faces trial on charges he and two other men operated a marijuana distribution ring allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

His two co-defendants, DeWayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 23, of Warrensburg, Mo., each pleaded guilty Friday to one count of conspiracy to distribute 100 grams or more of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Bryant admitted to obtaining marijuana in Texas and conspiring with Morris and Myers to distribute it in the Kansas City area. Myers also admitted to being part of the conspiracy and distributing marijuana in the Warrensburg and Columbia area.

The two men also agreed to testify against Morris, as has Vanover.

Five current or former Chiefs players and one team official are on a witness list to testify against Morris. The players are Vanover, Kimble Anders, Victor Riley, Eric Warfield and Joe Horn, who is now with the New Orleans Saints. Lamonte Winston, the Chiefs' director of player development, also is on the list.

All but Winston declined to comment Friday. Winston said he had no idea why he was on the list.

"I'm blindsided," Winston said. "This is news to me. Now you've got me trying to find out what's going on."

LANGUAGE: English

LOAD-DATE: August 7, 2000


6 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

August 5, 2000, Saturday, BC cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 542 words

HEADLINE: Chiefs: Witness list does not indicate other players involved

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

The attorney for former Chiefs running back Bam Morris says his client will not enter a plea agreement in his upcoming federal drug trial, even though two co-defendants pleaded guilty and agreed to testify against Morris.

"We're going to trial Aug. 14, definitely," lawyer William Rork said after the plea agreements were announced Friday.

Morris, 28, who retired abruptly after last season, faces trial on charges he and two other men operated a marijuana distribution ring allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

His two co-defendants, DeWayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 23, of Warrensburg, Mo., each pleaded guilty Friday to one count of conspiracy to distribute 100 grams or more of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Bryant admitted to obtaining marijuana in Texas and conspiring with Morris and Myers to distribute it in the Kansas City area. Myers also admitted to being part of the conspiracy and distributing marijuana in the Warrensburg and Columbia area.

The two men also agreed to testify against Morris, as has Vanover.

Five current or former Chiefs players and one team official are on a witness list to testify against Morris. The players are Vanover, Kimble Anders, Victor Riley, Eric Warfield and Joe Horn, who is now with the New Orleans Saints. Lamonte Winston, the Chiefs' director of player development, also is on the list.

All but Winston declined to comment Friday. Winston said he had no idea why he was on the list.

"I'm blindsided," Winston said. "This is news to me. Now you've got me trying to find out what's going on."

Chiefs president and general manager Carl Peterson said Friday that prosecutors are not alleging that any of the potential witnesses were involved in the drug ring.

"We have been in discussions with the FBI ever since Bam Morris was charged," Peterson said in a written statement. "At no point during those discussions has the FBI ever indicated that it believes any other person with the Kansas City Chiefs is involved."

The fact that someone is on a witness list doesn't mean they were involved in the ring or witnessed anything illegal, said Kansas City defense attorney Chris Harlan.

"They may be there to provide background information, and they may not testify at all," he said.

Friday's court filings also answered the lingering question of why Vanover would try to supplement his substantial NFL salary by financing a marijuana ring.

"Mr. Vanover owed the IRS a great deal of money," Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said at a court hearing. "Mr. Vanover expressed an interest in getting involved in a drug transaction in order to pay his debt."

Oliver said that immediately after receiving a $313,000 bonus from the Chiefs in 1999, Vanover began funneling money to Morris to finance the ring.

Vanover, who pleaded guilty to federal car-theft charges earlier this year, is expected to testify about $40,000 he allegedly gave to Morris to operate a marijuana-smuggling ring in the spring of 1999.

Gregory E. Burns, Vanover's friend and personal assistant, has pleaded guilty to helping Morris operate the ring, and is also scheduled to testify against him.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: August 6, 2000


7 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 The Kansas City Star Co.

THE KANSAS CITY STAR

August 5, 2000, Saturday METROPOLITAN EDITION

SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. D1

LENGTH: 832 words

HEADLINE: Morris case turns;
Ex-teammates may testify against him

BYLINE: MARK MORRIS; The Kansas City Star

BODY:

A flurry of court action Friday left former Chiefs running back
Bam Morris standing alone in his upcoming federal drug trial and
facing potentially damaging testimony from former teammates.

And in court filings, prosecutors made new allegations of Morris'
past drug-distribution activities, though they filed no fresh
charges.

After a day that saw Morris' two co-defendants plead guilty and
agree to testify, defense lawyer William Rork brushed off suggestions
that Morris also would consider a guilty plea.

"We are going to trial on Aug. 14, definitely," Rork said.

Friday's developments also answered one of the lingering
questions of the case - why former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick
Vanover, a promising player in the NFL and key witness against
Morris, would try to supplement his substantial income by financing a
marijuana ring.

"Mr. Vanover owed the IRS a great deal of money," Assistant
U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said at a court hearing. "Mr. Vanover
expressed an interest in getting involved in a drug transaction in
order to pay his debt."

Oliver said that immediately after receiving a $313,000 bonus
from the Chiefs in the spring of 1999, Vanover began funneling money
to Morris to finance the ring.

The case promises more insights into the pro football fraternity.
Tucked on page six of a government witness list released Friday were
the names of six current or former Chiefs players and employees.

In addition to Vanover, they were Kimble Anders, running back;
Victor Riley, offensive tackle; Eric Warfield, defensive back; Joe
Horn, now a New Orleans Saints wide receiver; and Lamonte Winston,
the Chiefs' director of player development.

All but Winston declined comment Friday. Speaking from Nashville,
Tenn., where the Chiefs play the Tennessee Titans tonight, Winston
said he was baffled by his designation as a witness.

"I'm blindsided," Winston said. "This is news to me. Now
you've got me trying to find out what's going on."

Vanover, who pleaded guilty to federal car-theft charges earlier
this year, is expected to testify about $40,000 he allegedly gave to
Morris to operate a marijuana-smuggling ring in the spring of 1999.
The witness list gave no indication as to how the other players or
employees would testify.

One Kansas City criminal defense lawyer cautioned against
speculating about their potential testimony.

"The mere fact someone is on a witness list doesn't mean they
were involved in or witnessed anything illegal," said Chris Harlan.
"They may be there to provide background information, and they may
not testify at all."

Late Friday, Chiefs president/general manager Carl Peterson
echoed that caution.

"We have been in discussions with the FBI ever since Bam Morris
was charged," Peterson said in a written statement. "At no point
during those discussions has the FBI ever indicated that it believes
that any other person with the Kansas City Chiefs is involved."

Prosecutors have alleged that Morris, 28, and two others operated
a marijuana-distribution ring financed, in part, by Vanover. In a
motion released Friday, Oliver asked a federal judge for permission
to tell the jury about other drug activities Morris allegedly was
involved in, but for which he had never been charged.

Those include:

Distributing the designer drug Ecstasy in the Kansas City area
from Jan. 1, 1998, until last spring.

Distributing cocaine while he was a student at Texas Tech.

Negotiating in 1998 to distribute drugs with a man who currently
is in federal prison.

Oliver asked to include this evidence because it shows Morris'
intent and willingness to deal drugs, court records said. Rork said
that he knew nothing of the new allegations and that he would fight
to keep them out of the trial.

"The reason they're doing this is to prejudice the potential
jury pool," Rork said. "If they had something, why didn't they file
(charges on) it?"

Two of Rork's biggest problems Friday may have come from the
guilty pleas to drug conspiracy and money-laundering charges of
Morris' co-defendants, Dewayne Calvin Bryant, 28, and Robert Corey
Myers, 23.

In separate hearings, each acknowledged a role in the
marijuana-smuggling ring financed by Vanover and operated by Morris
and Gregory E. Burns, Vanover's friend and personal assistant. Burns
also has pleaded guilty and is slated to testify against Morris.

At Bryant's hearing, Oliver said evidence would show how
thousands of dollars moved from Vanover to Morris to Bryant, who used
the money to buy drugs in Texas.

Oliver said that when Bryant returned with the drugs, Burns
arranged to have Myers sell the marijuana in Warrensburg, Mo. Later,
the proceeds returned to Burns, who turned them over to Vanover.

Vanover then stored the cash in a sack that his wife used to
store her wedding gown.
@ART CAPTION:Morris
@ART:Photo (color)

LOAD-DATE: August 5, 2000


8 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

August 4, 2000, Friday, BC cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 548 words

HEADLINE: Three Chiefs, former Chief on witness list for Morris drug trial

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

Three members of the Kansas City Chiefs and a former Chiefs player now with the New Orleans Saints were among 93 people on the witness list for the upcoming drug trial of former running back Bam Morris.

Running back Kimble Anders, tackle Victor Riley and receiver Eric Warfield of the Chiefs were on the list released Friday by the U.S. Attorney's office along with receiver Joe Horn of the Saints.

The others on the list were FBI agents, IRS investigators, Drug Enforcement Agency investigators, police officers, and various other people identified as being in prison, free on bond or whose current address was not known.

Morris, who retired abruptly after last season, faces trial Aug. 14 on charges he and two other men operated a marijuana distribution ring allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

Morris, who was on probation from drug charges in Texas at the time of his arrest, has been held without bond.

Vanover, who is cooperating with the government, has pleaded guilty to charges he sold a stolen car to a man in Florida. He also is on the witness list.

Morris, 28, was charged in a federal indictment May 10 along with DeWayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 22, of Warrensburg, Mo., with one count of conspiracy to distribute at least 220 pounds of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Bryant and Myers each pleaded guilty Friday and agreed to cooperate with the government. They pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to distribute 100 grams or more of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Bryant admitted to obtaining marijuana in Texas and conspiring with Morris and Myers to distribute it in the Kansas City area. Myers also admitted to being part of the conspiracy and distributing marijuana in the Warrensburg and Columbia area.

Morris' defense lawyer, William Rork, has said the case against the former running back rests solely on the word of Vanover.

The government alleges Morris and the other two men conspired since January 1998 to distribute marijuana in western Missouri.

Morris was arrested after marijuana residue was found in a car he was riding in when it left Vanover's driveway. His agent said then that Morris was "an innocent party."

Morris struggled during his two years with the Chiefs, battling a weight problem associated with medication to control his attention deficit disorder. He lost the starting job in training camp in 1999 to Anders, who missed most of the season with an Achilles' tendon injury. Morris finished the year with 414 yards and three touchdowns on 120 carries.

The Baltimore Ravens signed Morris in September 1996, but he was suspended for four games for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.

He also was suspended for the first four games of the 1997 season after an offseason NFL test revealed he had used alcohol. When he missed several meetings with his probation officer, he was sentenced to four months in jail. Morris was released by Baltimore after his sentencing.

The Chiefs tried him out, but he initially signed with the Chicago Bears. The Chiefs then traded for him with coach Marty Schottenheimer expressing the belief that the club could rehabilitate him.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: August 5, 2000


9 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

July 6, 2000, Thursday, BC cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 320 words

HEADLINE: Magistrate to investigate possible improper contact with co-defendant

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

A federal magistrate said he would investigate what may have been improper contact with a co-defendant in the money-laundering and drug case involving former Kansas City Chief Bam Morris.

Chief U.S. Magistrate John T. Maughmer said Morris' attorney, William Rork, and a friend, Kristene Davis, had talked to Dewayne Bryant without Bryant first speaking to his attorney.

Davis allegedly visited Bryant on June 17 after he was arrested and said she was working for Rork, said Jonathan Laurans, a lawyer representing Bryant.

If such contact occurred in a criminal case, it would be improper under judicial ethics.

Maughmer ordered Davis to provide Laurans a written memo detailing the conversation she had with Bryant. He also said he would review two taped conversations authorities made of Bryant talking with Rork and Davis.

"This is a veritable minefield and these are difficult, complex and serious issues," Maughmer said. If inappropriate contact was made, "I consider that to be a very serious problem."

Rork said he might be taken off the case if Maughmer determines he had improper contact with Bryant.

Rork said Davis was not his employee, although she had helped him gather information and speak to possible witnesses. Rork said he was not aware that Davis had contacted Bryant.

Maughmer also told Rork on Wednesday he would need to provide additional medical records before he would allow Morris to get a prescription for attention deficit disorder.

Prosecutors allege that Morris, Bryant and Robert Corey Myers operated a marijuana-distribution ring financed largely by former Kansas City Chiefs return specialist Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge, loaned Morris about $70,000. Federal prosecutors allege that Morris and the others conspired to launder much of that cash through a series of bank transactions to purchase marijuana.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: July 7, 2000


10 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 The Kansas City Star Co.

THE KANSAS CITY STAR

July 6, 2000, Thursday JOHNSON COUNTY EDITION

SECTION: METRO; Pg. B4

LENGTH: 419 words

HEADLINE: Ethics allegation enters Morris case

BYLINE: GLENN E. RICE; The Kansas City Star

BODY:

A federal magistrate said Wednesday he would investigate what may
have been improper contact with a co-defendant in a money-laundering
and drug case involving former Chiefs running back Bam Morris.

Chief U.S. Magistrate John T. Maughmer said Morris' attorney,
William Rork, and a friend, Kristene Davis, had talked to Dewayne
Bryant without Bryant first speaking to his attorney.

If such contact occurred in a criminal case, it would be improper
under judicial ethics.

Rork said he had asked Bryant to call him and say whether he had
hired a lawyer. Davis said she was a friend of Bryant's and spoke
with him after he was arrested.

Jonathan Laurans, a lawyer who represents Bryant, said Davis had
visited several jails in the Kansas City area on June 17, trying to
find out where Bryant was being held. When Davis found Bryant, she
said was working for Rork.

On Wednesday, Maughmer said he would review two taped
conversations authorities made of Bryant talking with Rork and Davis.

"This is veritable minefield and these are difficult, complex
and serious issues," Maughmer said. If inappropriate contact was
made, "I consider that to be a very serious problem."

Maughmer ordered Davis to provide Laurans a written memo
detailing the conversation she had with Bryant.

Rork said he might be taken off the case if Maughmer determines
he had improper contact with Bryant.

Prosecutors have alleged that Morris, Bryant and Robert Corey
Myers operated a marijuana-distribution ring financed largely by
former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge,
lent Morris about $70,000. Federal prosecutors allege that Morris and
the others conspired to launder much of that cash through a series of
bank transactions to purchase marijuana.

Rork said that, although Davis had helped him gather information
and speak to possible witnesses, she was not his employee. Rork said
he was not aware that Davis had contacted Bryant.

"I have asked her to do some things and she has done some things
on her own to assist with Morris' defense," Rork said.

Davis declined to comment following the hearing.

Also at the hearing Wednesday, Maughmer said Rork needed to
provide additional medical records before he would allow Morris to
get a prescription to treat attention deficit disorder.

Rork said Morris needed to take the medication twice a day to
help lawyers prepare for his trial.

LOAD-DATE: July 6, 2000


11 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 Times Publishing Company

St. Petersburg Times

 

June 01, 2000, Thursday, 0 South Pinellas Edition

SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 8C

LENGTH: 800 words

HEADLINE: Phillips pleads innocent

SOURCE: Compiled from Wire Reports

DATELINE: BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.

BODY:

Pleas of innocent to six charges, including an alleged beating of a girlfriend, were entered Wednesday by Lawrence Phillips, the former Nebraska star whose personal problems cut short his pro football career.

Superior Court Judge Elden Fox ordered Phillips held in lieu of $ 630,000 bond, the amount requested by prosecutors. Fox also ordered another bail hearing today and scheduled a preliminary hearing for June 13.

The 25-year-old running back had a previous domestic violence arrest involving a girlfriend while in college and was put on probation. Another probation sentence resulted from his plea of no contest in Plantation to a charge of hitting a woman in a bar.

Police were called to a Beverly Hills residence about 4 a.m. Saturday, where officers said they found Phillips' girlfriend had been attacked. He was arrested when he arrived at the home about eight hours later.

Phillips pleaded innocent to felony counts of corporal injury on a cohabitant, making a terrorist threat and conspiring to dissuade a witness, as well as misdemeanor counts of carrying a concealed firearm in a vehicle, carrying a loaded firearm and vandalism with damage of less than $ 400.

COURSON LOSES APPEAL: The league's retirement plan doesn't have to pay Steve Courson, a former offensive lineman for the Bucs and Steelers, an extra annuity for alcohol-related heart problems, a federal appeals panel ruled. Courson  sued the league's retirement board in 1997 in federal court in Pittsburgh. He contended that he drank to ease pain from game injuries, and was wrongly denied an enhancement to his $ 1,750-a-month pension, which is based on a non-football-related disability.

YOUNG GETS MORE TIME: Steve Young's future with the 49ers will in all likelihood be decided by June 10. Coach Steve Mariucci said Young, who has had four concussions in three years, has passed a battery of clinical tests indicating he's back to normal. Young asked for more time to make up his mind. Though he wants to play, Young is wrestling with whether the risks associated with his history of concussions are reasonable enough to resume his career. Young will have to consider the possibility of moving to another team should the salary cap-strapped 49ers determine he no longer fits in their plans. Denver and Seattle are possible destinations.

MORRIS TRIAL: Bam Morris, a former NFL running back facing legal problems, probably will testify at his own trial, his attorney said. Morris pleaded not guilty Tuesday to drug and money-laundering charges during a brief federal court hearing. His trial is scheduled for July 10. Defense attorney William Rork said Morris was guilty only of being associated with former Kansas City Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover. Vanover, who has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge, lent Morris about $ 70,000. Federal prosecutors alleged Morris used some of the money to purchase marijuana.

KELLY GETS A SCARE: Former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly suffered minor cuts and scrapes when a two-seat plane he was in crashed into the Bering Sea off the coast of Alaska during a hunting trip May 20. "We lost total power of the plane and the pilot turned and said, "Jim, brace yourself, we're going down,' " Kelly told Buffalo's WGRZ-TV. "I had some choice words and pretty much saw everything flash in front of me. I had to hurry and undo my seat belt and take off my helmet and knock out the windows. I had to swim to shore, but thank God, I'm still here," Kelly said. He said the troubles were blamed on water mixing with fuel.

BENGALS: The team and receiver Carl Pickens' agent have reached an agreement that would result in the controversial receiver being released by 4 p.m. today. The next step?   "We start calling teams," Steve Zucker said, "starting with the Jets." Pickens lists the Jets as his first choice. Coach Al Groh has indicated he is interested, but director of football operations Bill Parcells has said the Jets won't offer the money he was making in Cincinnati (a $ 23.5-million, five-year contract).

PANTHERS: A fifth off-season operation sidelined quarterback Steve Beuerlein as minicamp opened. Beuerlein had a second hernia-related operation. He also had an initial hernia operation, arthroscopic surgery on his left knee to repair torn cartilage and on his left ankle to remove bone chips, surgery on his right throwing shoulder for a bone spur and surgery when an exam showed a torn abductor tendon was not healing. Defensive end Robert Daniel, who missed last season with a neck injury, injured his left knee and is out for the season.

ARENA LEAGUE: Florida traded quarterback Fred McNair to Carolina for offensive specialist Jack Jackson, a former University of Florida standout, and rookie quarterback Jim Arellanes.

GRAPHIC: BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO; Lawrence Phillips

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: June 1, 2000


12 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 Times Publishing Company

St. Petersburg Times

 

June 01, 2000, Thursday, 0 South Pinellas Edition

SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 8C

LENGTH: 800 words

HEADLINE: Phillips pleads innocent

SOURCE: Compiled from Wire Reports

DATELINE: BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.

BODY:

Pleas of innocent to six charges, including an alleged beating of a girlfriend, were entered Wednesday by Lawrence Phillips, the former Nebraska star whose personal problems cut short his pro football career.

Superior Court Judge Elden Fox ordered Phillips held in lieu of $ 630,000 bond, the amount requested by prosecutors. Fox also ordered another bail hearing today and scheduled a preliminary hearing for June 13.

The 25-year-old running back had a previous domestic violence arrest involving a girlfriend while in college and was put on probation. Another probation sentence resulted from his plea of no contest in Plantation to a charge of hitting a woman in a bar.

Police were called to a Beverly Hills residence about 4 a.m. Saturday, where officers said they found Phillips' girlfriend had been attacked. He was arrested when he arrived at the home about eight hours later.

Phillips pleaded innocent to felony counts of corporal injury on a cohabitant, making a terrorist threat and conspiring to dissuade a witness, as well as misdemeanor counts of carrying a concealed firearm in a vehicle, carrying a loaded firearm and vandalism with damage of less than $ 400.

COURSON LOSES APPEAL: The league's retirement plan doesn't have to pay Steve Courson, a former offensive lineman for the Bucs and Steelers, an extra annuity for alcohol-related heart problems, a federal appeals panel ruled. Courson  sued the league's retirement board in 1997 in federal court in Pittsburgh. He contended that he drank to ease pain from game injuries, and was wrongly denied an enhancement to his $ 1,750-a-month pension, which is based on a non-football-related disability.

YOUNG GETS MORE TIME: Steve Young's future with the 49ers will in all likelihood be decided by June 10. Coach Steve Mariucci said Young, who has had four concussions in three years, has passed a battery of clinical tests indicating he's back to normal. Young asked for more time to make up his mind. Though he wants to play, Young is wrestling with whether the risks associated with his history of concussions are reasonable enough to resume his career. Young will have to consider the possibility of moving to another team should the salary cap-strapped 49ers determine he no longer fits in their plans. Denver and Seattle are possible destinations.

MORRIS TRIAL: Bam Morris, a former NFL running back facing legal problems, probably will testify at his own trial, his attorney said. Morris pleaded not guilty Tuesday to drug and money-laundering charges during a brief federal court hearing. His trial is scheduled for July 10. Defense attorney William Rork said Morris was guilty only of being associated with former Kansas City Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover. Vanover, who has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge, lent Morris about $ 70,000. Federal prosecutors alleged Morris used some of the money to purchase marijuana.

KELLY GETS A SCARE: Former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly suffered minor cuts and scrapes when a two-seat plane he was in crashed into the Bering Sea off the coast of Alaska during a hunting trip May 20. "We lost total power of the plane and the pilot turned and said, "Jim, brace yourself, we're going down,' " Kelly told Buffalo's WGRZ-TV. "I had some choice words and pretty much saw everything flash in front of me. I had to hurry and undo my seat belt and take off my helmet and knock out the windows. I had to swim to shore, but thank God, I'm still here," Kelly said. He said the troubles were blamed on water mixing with fuel.

BENGALS: The team and receiver Carl Pickens' agent have reached an agreement that would result in the controversial receiver being released by 4 p.m. today. The next step?   "We start calling teams," Steve Zucker said, "starting with the Jets." Pickens lists the Jets as his first choice. Coach Al Groh has indicated he is interested, but director of football operations Bill Parcells has said the Jets won't offer the money he was making in Cincinnati (a $ 23.5-million, five-year contract).

PANTHERS: A fifth off-season operation sidelined quarterback Steve Beuerlein as minicamp opened. Beuerlein had a second hernia-related operation. He also had an initial hernia operation, arthroscopic surgery on his left knee to repair torn cartilage and on his left ankle to remove bone chips, surgery on his right throwing shoulder for a bone spur and surgery when an exam showed a torn abductor tendon was not healing. Defensive end Robert Daniel, who missed last season with a neck injury, injured his left knee and is out for the season.

ARENA LEAGUE: Florida traded quarterback Fred McNair to Carolina for offensive specialist Jack Jackson, a former University of Florida standout, and rookie quarterback Jim Arellanes.

GRAPHIC: BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO; Lawrence Phillips

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: June 7, 2000


13 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 Times Publishing Company

St. Petersburg Times

 

June 01, 2000, Thursday, 0 South Pinellas Edition

SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 8C

LENGTH: 800 words

HEADLINE: Phillips pleads innocent

SOURCE: Compiled from Wire Reports

DATELINE: BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.

BODY:

Pleas of innocent to six charges, including an alleged beating of a girlfriend, were entered Wednesday by Lawrence Phillips, the former Nebraska star whose personal problems cut short his pro football career.

Superior Court Judge Elden Fox ordered Phillips held in lieu of $ 630,000 bond, the amount requested by prosecutors. Fox also ordered another bail hearing today and scheduled a preliminary hearing for June 13.

The 25-year-old running back had a previous domestic violence arrest involving a girlfriend while in college and was put on probation. Another probation sentence resulted from his plea of no contest in Plantation to a charge of hitting a woman in a bar.

Police were called to a Beverly Hills residence about 4 a.m. Saturday, where officers said they found Phillips' girlfriend had been attacked. He was arrested when he arrived at the home about eight hours later.

Phillips pleaded innocent to felony counts of corporal injury on a cohabitant, making a terrorist threat and conspiring to dissuade a witness, as well as misdemeanor counts of carrying a concealed firearm in a vehicle, carrying a loaded firearm and vandalism with damage of less than $ 400.

COURSON LOSES APPEAL: The league's retirement plan doesn't have to pay Steve Courson, a former offensive lineman for the Bucs and Steelers, an extra annuity for alcohol-related heart problems, a federal appeals panel ruled. Courson  sued the league's retirement board in 1997 in federal court in Pittsburgh. He contended that he drank to ease pain from game injuries, and was wrongly denied an enhancement to his $ 1,750-a-month pension, which is based on a non-football-related disability.

YOUNG GETS MORE TIME: Steve Young's future with the 49ers will in all likelihood be decided by June 10. Coach Steve Mariucci said Young, who has had four concussions in three years, has passed a battery of clinical tests indicating he's back to normal. Young asked for more time to make up his mind. Though he wants to play, Young is wrestling with whether the risks associated with his history of concussions are reasonable enough to resume his career. Young will have to consider the possibility of moving to another team should the salary cap-strapped 49ers determine he no longer fits in their plans. Denver and Seattle are possible destinations.

MORRIS TRIAL: Bam Morris, a former NFL running back facing legal problems, probably will testify at his own trial, his attorney said. Morris pleaded not guilty Tuesday to drug and money-laundering charges during a brief federal court hearing. His trial is scheduled for July 10. Defense attorney William Rork said Morris was guilty only of being associated with former Kansas City Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover. Vanover, who has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge, lent Morris about $ 70,000. Federal prosecutors alleged Morris used some of the money to purchase marijuana.

KELLY GETS A SCARE: Former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly suffered minor cuts and scrapes when a two-seat plane he was in crashed into the Bering Sea off the coast of Alaska during a hunting trip May 20. "We lost total power of the plane and the pilot turned and said, "Jim, brace yourself, we're going down,' " Kelly told Buffalo's WGRZ-TV. "I had some choice words and pretty much saw everything flash in front of me. I had to hurry and undo my seat belt and take off my helmet and knock out the windows. I had to swim to shore, but thank God, I'm still here," Kelly said. He said the troubles were blamed on water mixing with fuel.

BENGALS: The team and receiver Carl Pickens' agent have reached an agreement that would result in the controversial receiver being released by 4 p.m. today. The next step?   "We start calling teams," Steve Zucker said, "starting with the Jets." Pickens lists the Jets as his first choice. Coach Al Groh has indicated he is interested, but director of football operations Bill Parcells has said the Jets won't offer the money he was making in Cincinnati (a $ 23.5-million, five-year contract).

PANTHERS: A fifth off-season operation sidelined quarterback Steve Beuerlein as minicamp opened. Beuerlein had a second hernia-related operation. He also had an initial hernia operation, arthroscopic surgery on his left knee to repair torn cartilage and on his left ankle to remove bone chips, surgery on his right throwing shoulder for a bone spur and surgery when an exam showed a torn abductor tendon was not healing. Defensive end Robert Daniel, who missed last season with a neck injury, injured his left knee and is out for the season.

ARENA LEAGUE: Florida traded quarterback Fred McNair to Carolina for offensive specialist Jack Jackson, a former University of Florida standout, and rookie quarterback Jim Arellanes.

GRAPHIC: BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO; Lawrence Phillips

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: June 7, 2000


14 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 The Topeka Capital-Journal

TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL

June 1, 2000, Thursday

LENGTH: 1340 words

HEADLINE: Briefly in sports

BYLINE: Capital-Journal

BODY:

n  Briefly in sports

AREA

n Another Murphy signs with Coffeyville --- Ericka Murphy, an outfielder from Topeka High School, has signed a national letter of intent to play softball at Coffeyville Community College. Ericka is the third member of her family to sign with the Red Raiders: Her sister, Buffi Murphy, played softball there in 1998-99, and her brother, Michael Murphy, played football there from 1996-97.

n ESU men add transfer guard --- Matt Haynes, a 6-foot-3 guard from Rolla, Mo., has signed a letter of intent with Emporia State. Haynes, a junior in eligibility, averaged 15 points, 5 rebounds and 3 assists per game for Meramec Junior College in St. Louis last year. He shot 41 percent from 3-point range and was named a preseason NJCAA Division II All-American. Haynes becomes the Hornets' sixth recruit.

BASKETBALL

n Shaq heads pack --- The vote was finally unanimous for Shaquille O'Neal. The Los Angeles Lakers' center, who was one vote short of unanimous in the balloting for the NBA's MVP, became only the sixth player since 1982 to be a unanimous choice for the league's all-star team. He was joined on the first team by Seattle's Gary Payton, Minnesota's Kevin Garnett, San Antonio's Tim Duncan and Jason Kidd of Phoenix. The only unanimous choices in the past 18 seasons were Michael Jordan (four times), Larry Bird (three times), Karl Malone (twice), and Magic Johnson and Charles Barkley (once each).

n Grizzlies expected to name Lowe as coach --- The Vancouver Grizzlies called a news conference for today and were expected to introduce Sidney Lowe as their new coach. Grizzlies president Dick Versace has been negotiating with Lowe, a former NBA player and head coach with the Minnesota Timberwolves, for the past few weeks. Several reports have said Lowe has agreed to accept the job.

n Abdul-Jabbar jumps Clippers' ship --- Kareem Abdul-Jabbar will not return as an assistant coach with the Los Angeles Clippers next season, fellow Clippers assistant Dennis Johnson told the Los Angeles Times. Abdul-Jabbar, a six-time NBA champion and star at UCLA, joined the Clippers in early February under interim coach Jim Todd.

n CBA teams to play Division I opponents --- Teams from the Continental Basketball Association will play NCAA Division I teams this fall in a series of exhibition games, the league and the National Association of Basketball Coaches announced Wednesday. Beginning in November, each team from the professional league will play up to 10 exhibition games within their schedule, some against top college teams. The announcement of the schedules will be made at a later date.

GENERAL

n PGA taking cart case to Supreme Court? --- The PGA Tour plans to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether Casey Martin should be allowed to ride a cart, Martin's lawyer said Wednesday. Roy Reardon, who began working on the case after Martin won his lawsuit two years ago in federal court, said the tour asked for a 60-day extension to file its motion with the Supreme Court and was given until July 5. The tour's policy board met last week in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., and Reardon said tour officials sent an application to Justice Sandra Day O'Connor in which they ''now intend to file'' a petition with the court. PGA Tour spokesman Bob Combs confirmed that the board discussed the Martin case, but ''the tour is not yet prepared to make an announcement.''

n Husker coach sweeps honors --- Nebraska's sweep of the men's and women's conference track and field championships earned coach Gary Pepin the Big 12 outdoor track coach of the year honors for both teams. He is the first coach in the Big 12 to claim both the men's and women's outdoor awards in the same year.

n Neilson to hear fate with Flyers next week --- Roger Neilson said he doesn't mind waiting a week to find out more about his future with the Philadelphia Flyers. Neilson said he spoke to general manager Bob Clarke on Tuesday and was told his status with the team would likely be determined next week. ''The sooner I find something out, I can pursue other things,'' said Neilson, who was driving home to Ontario on Wednesday. Neilson stepped down as coach of the Flyers to undergo cancer treatment in February. He has said Clarke promised him he could return to the head coaching position after he recovered from a stem cell bone-marrow transplant.

n China defeats U.S. --- China avenged its women's World Cup championship loss to the United States with a 1-0 victory over the Americans at the Pacific Cup on Wednesday. China's Wen Sun scored on a penalty kick in the 85th minute of the first meeting between the teams since the U.S. won the World Cup final in a shootout last July 10. Earlier, Canada rallied late for a 2-1 victory over New Zealand.

FOOTBALL

n Ex-Chief Morris pleads not guilty --- Bam Morris, a former NFL running back facing legal problems, probably will testify at his own trial, his attorney said Tuesday. Morris pleaded not guilty Tuesday in Kansas City, Mo., to drug and money-laundering charges during a brief federal court hearing. His trial is scheduled for July 10. Defense attorney William Rork said Morris was guilty only of being associated with former Kansas City Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge, lent Morris about $70,000. Federal prosecutors alleged Morris used some of the money to purchase marijuana. Court documents allege Morris and two other men conspired to transport more than 200 pounds of marijuana from Texas into Missouri and Kansas. 

n Phillips in trouble, again --- Pleas of innocent to six charges, including an alleged beating of a girlfriend, were entered on Wednesday by Lawrence Phillips, the former Nebraska star whose personal problems cut short his pro football career. Superior Court Judge Elden Fox ordered Phillips held in lieu of $630,000 bond, the amount requested by prosecutors. But Fox also ordered another bail hearing Thursday and scheduled a preliminary hearing for June 13. The 25-year-old running back had a previous domestic violence arrest involving a girlfriend while in college and was put on probation.

BASEBALL

n Sox lose Valentin for season --- Red Sox third baseman John Valentin has been lost for the remainder of the season because of a ruptured tendon in his left knee, Valentin's agent said Wednesday. Valentin will require surgery to fix his patellar tendon, which tests showed had been pulled away from the bone. The veteran infielder's knee buckled when he attempted to field a routine groundball in the second inning of Tuesday night's 8-2 victory over the Kansas City Royals at Fenway Park. Valentin collapsed in obvious pain and was taken to University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester.

n Grace rejoins Cubs --- Chicago Cubs first baseman Mark Grace was activated from the 15-day disabled list Wednesday and infielder Jose Nieves was put on the DL with a strained left hamstring. Grace went on the DL on May 11 with a strained left hamstring. Grace had been batting .333 (25-for-75) in his last 20 games before being injured. Nieves was hurt running to first base in the fifth inning of Tuesday night's game against Atlanta.

n Umps, owners extend agreement --- Negotiators for major league umpires and owners agreed Wednesday to extend their interim agreement by a month through June. Under the interim agreement, which was announced March 21 and had been due to expire Wednesday, the sides agreed to keep in place the terms of the contract that ended Dec. 31. The sides also agreed not to start a strike or lockout without 14 days notice. Wednesday's extension runs through June 30. That means there cannot be a work stoppage through July 14.

THE LAST WORD

n Bernie Miklasz --- St. Louis Post-Dispatch columist, refuting baseball's claim that the ball is not juiced: "The national pastime has become slow pitch softball, minus the beer-keg station at second base."

--- Compiled from staff and wire reports

LOAD-DATE: June 6, 2000


15 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

May 31, 2000, Wednesday, BC cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 163 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs running back pleads not guilty to drug charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

Bam Morris, a former NFL running back facing legal problems, will probably testify at his own trial, his attorney said Tuesday.

Morris pleaded not guilty Tuesday to drug and money-laundering charges during a brief federal court hearing. His trial is scheduled for July 10.

Defense attorney William Rork said Morris was guilty only of being associated with former Kansas City Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge, lent Morris about $70,000. Federal prosecutors alleged Morris used some of the money to purchase marijuana.

Court documents allege Morris and two other men conspired to transport more than 200 pounds of marijuana from Texas into Missouri and Kansas.

Rork said the allegations against Morris rested almost entirely on the words of Vanover and Vanover's former personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns, who also faces drug-trafficking charges. Both are cooperating with authorities.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: June 1, 2000


16 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

May 31, 2000, Wednesday, BC cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 164 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs running back pleads not guilty to drug charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

Bam Morris, a former Kansas City Chiefs running back facing legal problems, will probably testify at his own trial, his attorney said Tuesday.

Morris pleaded not guilty Tuesday to drug and money-laundering charges during a brief federal court hearing. His trial is scheduled for July 10.

Defense attorney William Rork said Morris was guilty only of being associated with former Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge, lent Morris about $70,000. Federal prosecutors alleged Morris used some of the money to purchase marijuana.

Court documents allege Morris and two other men conspired to transport more than 200 pounds of marijuana from Texas into Missouri and Kansas.

Rork said the allegations against Morris rested almost entirely on the words of Vanover and Vanover's former personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns, who also faces drug-trafficking charges. Both are cooperating with authorities.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: June 1, 2000


17 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

May 31, 2000, Wednesday, BC cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 161 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs running back pleads innocent to drug charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

Bam Morris, a former NFL running back facing legal problems, will probably testify at his own trial, his attorney says.

Morris pleaded innocent Tuesday to drug and money-laundering charges during a brief federal court hearing. His trial is scheduled for July 10.

Defense attorney William Rork said Morris was guilty only of being associated with former Kansas City Chiefs kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car charge, lent Morris about $70,000. Federal prosecutors alleged Morris used some of the money to purchase marijuana.

Court documents allege Morris and two other men conspired to transport more than 200 pounds of marijuana from Texas into Missouri and Kansas.

Rork said the allegations against Morris rested almost entirely on the words of Vanover and Vanover's former personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns, who also faces drug-trafficking charges. Both are cooperating with authorities.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: June 1, 2000


18 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 Dayton Newspapers, Inc.

Dayton Daily News

May 12, 2000, Friday, CITY EDITION

SECTION: SPORTS, Pg. 1D

LENGTH: 430 words

HEADLINE: RAIDERS SAFETY REPORTEDLY HAS SERIOUS ILLNESS; BAM MORRIS INDICTED AGAIN

BYLINE: Associated Press

BODY:

Oakland Raiders safety Eric Turner has a serious stomach illness, the Los Angeles Daily News reported Thursday.

''It's a terrible, terrible situation,'' said a Raiders official who spoke on condition of anonymity. ''We're going to respect the family's wishes on this, but people should be really concerned about this kid.''

The official declined comment when asked if the ailment was life-threatening. Turner was believed to be at a Ventura County hospital. The nine-year veteran missed minicamp last week for personal reasons.

''(When) I saw him at the end of the year, he told me he was having trouble keeping food down,'' said Chiefs assistant head coach Willie Shaw.

The 31-year-old Turner was the second overall pick by the Cleveland Browns out of UCLA in the 1991 draft. He spent six years with the Browns, who later became the Baltimore Ravens. He signed with the Raiders in 1997.

BAM IN TROUBLE AGAIN

Former Chiefs running back Bam Morris was charged in a federal grand jury indictment for alleged drug and money laundering activities. If convicted, Morris could spend 40 years in prison and be fined as much as $ 3.5 million.

Morris retired abruptly at the end of the 1999 season. An indictment charges him and two other men with conspiracy to distribute more than 220 pounds of marijuana. Morris, who is being held without bond, was on probation for a marijuana conviction in Texas when he was arrested in Kansas City.

Morris' participation in the drug operation allegedly was financed by Tamarick Vanover, a former kick returner for the Chiefs. Vanover is cooperating with the investigation after pleading guilty to another charge.

Morris' attorney, William Rork, said the charges against Morris were based solely on the words of Vanover and his personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns, who also has been charged in the case.

CHREBET FINED IN COURT

Jets receiver Wayne Chrebet and ex-Colts running back Keith Elias were fined $ 230 each after pleading guilty to a nuisance violation outside a New Jersey bar. Chrebet, Elias and two of Elias' brothers were arrested Feb. 6 after a disagreement spilled onto the sidewalk.

SAINTS CUT DRAKEFORD

Cornerback Tyronne Drakeford refused to take a pay cut and was released by New Orleans. ''We did not see Tyronne as a starter and could not see paying him like one,'' GM Randy Mueller said. Drakeford, a six-year veteran, had three years left on a contract that was to pay him $ 1.53 million this year. Drakeford's agent said several teams have expressed interest in signing him.

LOAD-DATE: May 13, 2000


19 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 The Kansas City Star Co.

THE KANSAS CITY STAR

May 12, 2000, Friday METROPOLITAN EDITION

SECTION: METRO; Pg. B2 ;METROPOLITAN DIGEST

LENGTH: 1459 words

HEADLINE: Metropolitan digest

BODY:

KANSAS CITY
Fund established

School officials have set up a fund for a second-grader who died
after he was struck by a car near his school.

The car hit TraShun Hicks, 8, on April 27 on Woodland Avenue at
35th Street. TraShun was walking home from Franklin Elementary School
when he darted into the road. TraShun died at a hospital a week
later.

His family would like to bury TraShun in their home state of
Arkansas but will need help to pay for it, said Franklin Elementary
Principal Lonnie Jackson.

Jackson said donations may be sent to the fund at Douglas
National Bank, 1670 E. 63rd St., Kansas City, MO, 64110.
Victim identified

A man killed in a shooting early Monday was identified Thursday
as Billy E. Baker, 24, of Kansas City. Police found Baker's body
inside a home he frequented in the 4000 block of East 56th Terrace.
No one has been arrested in the case and detectives did not release a
motive.
Stamp ceremony

A new first-class stamp celebrating adoption was featured at a
special cancellation ceremony Thursday at the Grace Assembly of God
church in Kansas City.

The colorful 33-cent stamp, now on sale nationwide, expresses the
themes of shaping a life, building a home and creating a world by
adopting a child.

"The message we want to convey ... is awareness of how adoption
can make a positive difference in the lives of many young children,"
said Kansas City Postmaster John M. Coolidge.

The stamp was designed by a Maryland artist who was adopted.
Not-guilty plea

Dewayne Calvin Bryant, charged with former Kansas City Chief Bam
Morris
in a marijuana trafficking scheme, pleaded not guilty to all
counts at a brief federal court hearing Thursday.

Bryant, like Morris, is being held without bond pending his July
10 trial on conspiracy, drug trafficking and money laundering
charges. A third man charged in the case, Robert Corey Myers, is free
on bond.

On Wednesday, a federal grand jury indicted the men, replacing a
criminal complaint filed against them in April.

Bryant's attorney declined comment. William Rork, an attorney
representing Morris, said, "I'm glad to see the government move
quickly because every day Bam stays in jail is a tragedy, especially
when innocent people are detained without bond."
School bus accident

A school bus carrying students to Nowlin Middle School, 2800 S.
Hardy Ave., ran up on a curb Thursday morning in front of the school,
causing several children to complain of headaches and stomach aches.
Eight children were taken to Children's Mercy Hospital for
observation but no serious injuries were reported. School district
officials are investigating the incident.
Plane diverted

A TWA plane bound for Sacramento, Calif., was diverted to Kansas
City International Airport and landed safely about noon Thursday
after a light indicated a problem with the landing gear.

Flight 253 originated in St. Louis, said Julia Bishop-Cross, a
TWA spokeswoman. Bishop-Cross said the plane had a faulty indicator
light and it landed at KCI because the airline's maintenance base is
at the airport. The MD-80 had 112 passengers and five crew members.
THE AREA
Donations for puppies

Veterinarians are offering services, and donated Puppy chow now
weighs into the tons. Thousands of animal lovers - from Florida to
California - have called.

Nashville Animal Control has been inundated with nothing but
puppy love after officials there discovered about 150 purebred
puppies overheated inside a truck coming from Purdy, Mo.

Officials estimated temperatures inside the broken-down vehicle
hit 100 degrees. Four puppies died. The truckdriver has been charged
with cruelty to animals and inhumane transport conditions. The Purdy
puppy farm owner said he did not violate laws covering animal
transport on the way to pet stores.

Meanwhile, the recuperating canines remain at Nashville's shelter
until a court date on June 7 determines their fate.

People interested in sending donations for the puppies' care can
make checks out to: Metro Nashville Animal Control and send them to
the same at 311 23rd Ave. North, Nashville, Tenn., 37203.
Baby shower

Kiwanis Clubs and Hy-Vee stores throughout the metropolitan area
are planning "baby showers" on Saturday to collect infant and
toddler items for the Children's Council of the Heartland.

The Children's Council is a partnership of agencies that provide
services for children. They were brought together by the clubs.

The 24 clubs will collect baby items at 20 Hy-Vee stores in six
counties from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Diapers, formula, baby
food, baby clothing and similar items are sought.
INDEPENDENCE
Motorcyclist killed

Police are investigating what caused a motorcyclist to crash into
a Metro bus earlier this week.

Clarence E. Thompson, 78, died about 6:30 p.m. Tuesday when his
motorcycle struck the rear of a Metro bus that had stopped at U.S. 24
and Brookside Avenue to pick up passengers.

Bill Pross, police spokesman, said neither excessive speed nor
alcohol nor drugs appeared to be a factor. The bus driver reported
minor injuries. Thompson was pronounced dead at North Kansas City
Hospital. His death is the second traffic fatality in Independence
this year, Pross said.
PARKVILLE
Anniversary week

Park University is celebrating its 125th birthday this week.

A highlight of the celebration is the university's annual awards
banquet on Friday - the same day the university first had classes at
a hotel on the edge of the Missouri River.

In addition to presenting awards, university officials also will
unveil commemorative artwork by local artist Carolyn Payne.
WYANDOTTE COUNTY
Driver charged

Michael L. Evans of Kansas City, was charged Wednesday with
vehicular homicide and leaving the scene of an accident and speeding
in connection with the March 21 hit-and-run crash that killed
Northland resident Calvin Joseph Hawkins.

Hawkins, 52, was broadsided as he tried to turn left onto
Parallel Parkway from 43rd Street. Witnesses told police that the
driver of the other car stopped, got out of his car, cursed and then
drove off.

Police said witnesses gave them the license plate number of the
car that hit Hawkins. Evans had not been arrested Thursday.
JOHNSON COUNTY
Reimbursement

Former students of the now-defunct Monticello University have
until Aug. 8 to file for tuition reimbursement, the Kansas attorney
general's office said Thursday.

A Johnson County district judge ruled April 20 that the online
university and its president, Leslie Edwin Snell, had violated the
Kansas Consumer Protection Act. Snell has been ordered to reimburse
former students for educational services and merchandise and to pay a
$1.5 million civil fine.

Students who want to seek reimbursement should call the attorney
general's office at (800) 432-2310 or (785) 296-3751.

Complaint forms are available at www.ink.org/public/ksag
Police shooting

A 19-year-old Kansas City, Kan., man who was shot by police early
Tuesday was charged Wednesday with aggravated assault on a law
enforcement officer and eluding police, both felonies.

Troyton K. Mozingo was in fair condition Thursday at a hospital.
Authorities said an officer saw Mozingo run a red light at 18th
Street and Quindaro Boulevard about 1:20 a.m. Tuesday. Mozingo
refused to pull over when the officer activated emergency lights and
plowed into a pole a few blocks later at Cleveland Avenue and
Hiawatha Street. Mozingo allegedly jumped from the wrecked car and
pointed a rifle at the officer. The officer fired at least once,
hitting Mozingo in the upper torso.

The 30-year-old officer, a 5-year veteran, remained on paid
administrative leave Thursday.
Peeping case

An Aug. 28 trial date was set Thursday for a softball umpire
charged with peeping into a women's restroom at a Johnson County
park. Kelley R. Haney is charged with a misdemeanor count of
eavesdropping at Heritage Park, 159th Street and Pflumm Road, between
July 1998 and October. Haney, 35, of Olathe pleaded not guilty at a
hearing last week.
SHAWNEE MISSION
Special board meeting

The Shawnee Mission school board plans a special meeting at 8:30
a.m. Saturday at board offices, 7235 Antioch Road in Overland Park.

The board plans to go into executive session to discuss
Superintendent Marjorie Kaplan's evaluation.
@ART CAPTION:Going against the wind- Emily Moore and Brandon Smith
battled the wind Thursday afternoon as they headed for City Hall
downtown.
@ART:Photo
@ART CREDIT:KEITH MYERS/The Kansas City Star

LOAD-DATE: May 12, 2000


20 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 The Kansas City Star Co.

THE KANSAS CITY STAR

May 12, 2000, Friday JOHNSON COUNTY EDITION

SECTION: METRO; Pg. B2 ;METROPOLITAN DIGEST

LENGTH: 1422 words

HEADLINE: Metropolitan digest

BODY:

JOHNSON COUNTY
Reimbursement

Former students of the now-defunct Monticello University have
until Aug. 8 to file for tuition reimbursement, the Kansas attorney
general's office said Thursday.

A Johnson County district judge ruled April 20 that the online
university and its president, Leslie Edwin Snell, had violated the
Kansas Consumer Protection Act. Snell has been ordered to reimburse
former students for educational services and merchandise and to pay a
$1.5 million civil fine.

Students who want to seek reimbursement should call the attorney
general's office at (800) 432-2310 or (785) 296-3751.

Complaint forms are available at www.ink.org/public/ksag
Police shooting

A 19-year-old Kansas City, Kan., man who was shot by police early
Tuesday was charged Wednesday with aggravated assault on a law
enforcement officer and eluding police, both felonies.

Troyton K. Mozingo was in fair condition Thursday at a hospital.
Authorities said an officer saw Mozingo run a red light at 18th
Street and Quindaro Boulevard about 1:20 a.m. Tuesday. Mozingo
refused to pull over when the officer activated emergency lights and
plowed into a pole a few blocks later at Cleveland Avenue and
Hiawatha Street.

Mozingo allegedly jumped from the wrecked car and pointed a rifle
at the officer. The officer fired at least once, hitting Mozingo in
the upper torso.

The 30-year-old officer, a 5-year veteran, remained on paid
administrative leave Thursday.
Peeping case

An Aug. 28 trial date was set Thursday for a softball umpire
charged with peeping into a women's restroom at a Johnson County
park.

Kelley R. Haney is charged with a misdemeanor count of
eavesdropping at Heritage Park, 159th Street and Pflumm Road, between
July 1998 and October.

Haney, 35, of Olathe pleaded not guilty at a hearing last week.
OLATHE
Truck hits main

Natural gas leaked Thursday afternoon when a tractor-trailer
struck a gas main on U.S. 169 near 157th Street. No one was seriously
injured in the 1:30 p.m. crash, officials said. Highway traffic was
stopped for less than an hour while workers sealed the leak.
SHAWNEE MISSION
Special board meeting

The Shawnee Mission school board plans a special meeting at 8:30
a.m. Saturday at board offices, 7235 Antioch Road in Overland Park.

The board plans to go into executive session to discuss
Superintendent Marjorie Kaplan's evaluation.
KANSAS CITY
Fund established

School officials have set up a fund for a second-grader who died
after he was struck by a car near his school.

The car hit TraShun Hicks, 8, on April 27 on Woodland Avenue at
35th Street. TraShun was walking home from Franklin Elementary School
when he darted into the road. TraShun died at a hospital a week
later.

His family would like to bury TraShun in their home state of
Arkansas but will need help to pay for it, said Franklin Elementary
Principal Lonnie Jackson.

Jackson said donations may be sent to the fund at Douglas
National Bank, 1670 E. 63rd St., Kansas City, MO, 64110.
Victim identified

A man killed in a shooting early Monday was identified Thursday
as Billy E. Baker, 24, of Kansas City.

Police found Baker's body inside a home he frequented in the 4000
block of East 56th Terrace. No one has been arrested in the case and
detectives did not release a motive.
Stamp ceremony

A new first-class stamp celebrating adoption was featured at a
special cancellation ceremony Thursday at the Grace Assembly of God
church in Kansas City.

The colorful 33-cent stamp, now on sale nationwide, expresses the
themes of shaping a life, building a home and creating a world by
adopting a child.

"The message we want to convey ... is awareness of how adoption
can make a positive difference in the lives of many young children,"
said Kansas City Postmaster John M. Coolidge.

The stamp was designed by a Maryland artist who was adopted.
Not guilty plea

Dewayne Calvin Bryant, charged with former Kansas City Chief Bam
Morris
in a marijuana trafficking scheme, pleaded not guilty to all
counts at a brief federal court hearing Thursday.

Bryant, like Morris, is being held without bond pending his July
10 trial on conspiracy, drug trafficking and money laundering
charges.

A third man charged in the case, Robert Corey Myers, is free on
bond.

On Wednesday, a federal grand jury indicted the men, replacing a
criminal complaint filed against them in April.

Bryant's attorney declined comment.

William Rork, an attorney representing Morris, said, "I'm glad
to see the government move quickly because every day Bam stays in
jail is a tragedy, especially when innocent people are detained
without bond."
Plane diverted

A TWA plane bound for Sacramento, Calif., was diverted to Kansas
City International Airport and landed safely about noon Thursday
after a light indicated a problem with the landing gear.

Flight 253 originated in St. Louis, said Julia Bishop-Cross, a
spokeswoman for TWA. Bishop-Cross said the plane had a faulty
indicator light and it landed at KCI because the airline's
maintenance base is at the airport.

The MD-80 had 112 passengers and five crew members on board.
THE AREA
Donations for puppies

Veterinarians are offering services, and donated Puppy chow now
weighs into the tons. Thousands of animal lovers - from Florida to
California - have called.

Nashville Animal Control has been inundated with nothing but
puppy love after officials there discovered about 150 purebred
puppies overheated inside a truck coming from Purdy, Mo.

Officials estimated temperatures inside the broken-down vehicle
hit 100 degrees. Four puppies died. The truckdriver has been charged
with cruelty to animals and inhumane transport conditions. The Purdy
puppy farm owner said he did not violate laws covering animal
transport on the way to pet stores.

Meanwhile, the recuperating canines remain at Nashville's shelter
until a court date on June 7 determines their fate.

People interested in sending donations for the puppies' care can
make checks out to: Metro Nashville Animal Control and send them to
the same at 311 23rd Ave. North, Nashville, Tenn., 37203.
Baby shower

Kiwanis Clubs and Hy-Vee stores throughout the metropolitan area
are planning "baby showers" on Saturday to collect infant and
toddler items for the Children's Council of the Heartland.

The Children's Council is a partnership of agencies that provide
services for children. They were brought together by the clubs.

The 24 clubs will collect baby items at 20 Hy-Vee stores in six
counties from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Diapers, formula, baby
food, baby clothing and similar items are sought.
INDEPENDENCE
Motorcyclist killed

Police are investigating what caused a motorcyclist to crash into
a Metro bus earlier this week.

Clarence E. Thompson, 78, died about 6:30 p.m. Tuesday when his
motorcycle struck the rear of a Metro bus that had stopped at U.S. 24
and Brookside Avenue to pick up passengers.

Bill Pross, police spokesman, said neither excessive speed nor
alcohol nor drugs appeared to be a factor.

The bus driver reported minor injuries. Thompson was pronounced
dead at North Kansas City Hospital. His death is the second traffic
fatality in Independence this year, Pross said.
WYANDOTTE COUNTY
Driver charged

Michael L. Evans of Kansas City, was charged Wednesday with
vehicular homicide and leaving the scene of an accident - both
misdemeanors - and speeding in connection with the March 21
hit-and-run crash that killed Northland resident Calvin Joseph
Hawkins.

Hawkins, 52, was broadsided as he tried to turn left onto
Parallel Parkway from 43rd Street. Witnesses told police that the
driver of the other car stopped, got out of his car, cursed and then
drove off.

Police said witnesses gave them the license plate number of the
car that hit Hawkins. Evans had not been arrested Thursday.
@ART CAPTION:A closer look at carving- Gary Moser of Stilwell worked
on a totem pole during a woodcarving class Thursday at the Overland
Park 50 Plus Center. In the background are other members of the
class, which is taught by Herb Cast of Overland Park. From left are
Josie Fanciulli of Leawood, Ida Moore of Mission and Fran Price of
Overland Park.
@ART CREDIT:TODD FEEBACK/The Kansas City Star
@ART CAPTION:New stamp
@ART:Photos (2)

LOAD-DATE: May 12, 2000


21 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

May 11, 2000, Thursday, PM cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 639 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs running back indicted on additional drug charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

Bam Morris, the former Kansas City Chiefs running back who was often troubled during his six-year NFL career, faces more legal problems.

Morris, who retired abruptly at the end of the 1999 season, was charged in a federal grand jury indictment for alleged drug and money laundering activities. If convicted, Morris could spend 40 years in prison and be fined as much as $3.5 million.

The indictment was issued Wednesday in Kansas City. It charges Morris, 28, Dewayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 22 of Warrensburg, Mo., with one count of conspiracy to distribute at least 220 pounds of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Morris and Bryant also were charged with one count of distribution of marijuana and Myers with one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said Wednesday's charges replace a one-count criminal complaint that charged the three with conspiracy to distribute more than 220 pounds of marijuana.

The indictments resulted from an investigation by the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service. Morris, Bryant and Myers are accused of conspiring with others since at least January 1998 to distribute marijuana in western Missouri and elsewhere.

Morris and Bryant are being held without bond, while Myers is free on bond pending further court appearances. Bryant is scheduled to appear in federal court today.

Morris was on probation for a marijuana conviction in Texas when he was arrested in Kansas City. Texas authorities have issued an arrest warrant for violating terms of the probation.

Chris Whitley, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office, said Morris' federal charges would have to be resolved before he answered the Texas warrant.

Morris, who pleaded innocent to the earlier complaint, was denied bond last month by U.S. Magistrate Judge John T. Maughmer.

"I don't have any particular confidence you will follow my conditions (of release) any more than you've followed the conditions from Texas," Maughmer said in denying bond.

Morris' participation was allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick return specialist Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who is cooperating with the investigation after pleading guilty to his role in selling a stolen car, was cut by the Chiefs after it was revealed he admitted to an FBI agent that he gave $40,000 to Morris to buy drugs.

The indictment also alleges that Morris, Bryant and Myers conspired to launder much of that cash through a series of bank transactions.

Morris' attorney, William Rork, said last month the charges against Morris were based solely on the words of Vanover and his personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns. Burns also has been charged in the case.

An affidavit filed earlier this year in connection with drug charges against Burns refers to Morris, stating he was a passenger in a vehicle that was found to have marijuana residue after it left Vanover's driveway. His agent said then that Morris was "an innocent party."

Morris struggled during his two years with the Chiefs, battling a weight problem associated with medication to control his attention deficit disorder. He lost the starting job in training camp in 1999 to Kimble Anders, who missed most of the season with an Achilles' tendon injury. Morris finished the year with 414 yards and three touchdowns on 120 carries.

The Baltimore Ravens signed Morris in September 1996, but he was suspended for four games for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.

He also was suspended for the first four games of the 1997 season after an offseason NFL test revealed he had used alcohol. When he missed several meetings with his probation officer, he was sentenced to four months in jail. Morris was released by Baltimore after his sentencing.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: May 12, 2000


22 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

May 11, 2000, Thursday, PM cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 639 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs running back indicted on additional drug charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

Bam Morris, the former Kansas City Chiefs running back who was often troubled during his six-year NFL career, faces more legal problems.

Morris, who retired abruptly at the end of the 1999 season, was charged in a federal grand jury indictment for alleged drug and money laundering activities. If convicted, Morris could spend 40 years in prison and be fined as much as $3.5 million.

The indictment was issued Wednesday in Kansas City. It charges Morris, 28, Dewayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 22 of Warrensburg, Mo., with one count of conspiracy to distribute at least 220 pounds of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Morris and Bryant also were charged with one count of distribution of marijuana and Myers with one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said Wednesday's charges replace a one-count criminal complaint that charged the three with conspiracy to distribute more than 220 pounds of marijuana.

The indictments resulted from an investigation by the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service. Morris, Bryant and Myers are accused of conspiring with others since at least January 1998 to distribute marijuana in western Missouri and elsewhere.

Morris and Bryant are being held without bond, while Myers is free on bond pending further court appearances. Bryant is scheduled to appear in federal court today.

Morris was on probation for a marijuana conviction in Texas when he was arrested in Kansas City. Texas authorities have issued an arrest warrant for violating terms of the probation.

Chris Whitley, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office, said Morris' federal charges would have to be resolved before he answered the Texas warrant.

Morris, who pleaded innocent to the earlier complaint, was denied bond last month by U.S. Magistrate Judge John T. Maughmer.

"I don't have any particular confidence you will follow my conditions (of release) any more than you've followed the conditions from Texas," Maughmer said in denying bond.

Morris' participation was allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick return specialist Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who is cooperating with the investigation after pleading guilty to his role in selling a stolen car, was cut by the Chiefs after it was revealed he admitted to an FBI agent that he gave $40,000 to Morris to buy drugs.

The indictment also alleges that Morris, Bryant and Myers conspired to launder much of that cash through a series of bank transactions.

Morris' attorney, William Rork, said last month the charges against Morris were based solely on the words of Vanover and his personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns. Burns also has been charged in the case.

An affidavit filed earlier this year in connection with drug charges against Burns refers to Morris, stating he was a passenger in a vehicle that was found to have marijuana residue after it left Vanover's driveway. His agent said then that Morris was "an innocent party."

Morris struggled during his two years with the Chiefs, battling a weight problem associated with medication to control his attention deficit disorder. He lost the starting job in training camp in 1999 to Kimble Anders, who missed most of the season with an Achilles' tendon injury. Morris finished the year with 414 yards and three touchdowns on 120 carries.

The Baltimore Ravens signed Morris in September 1996, but he was suspended for four games for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.

He also was suspended for the first four games of the 1997 season after an offseason NFL test revealed he had used alcohol. When he missed several meetings with his probation officer, he was sentenced to four months in jail. Morris was released by Baltimore after his sentencing.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

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23 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 Associated Press

AP Online

May 10, 2000; Wednesday

SECTION: Sports

LENGTH: 518 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs RB Faces More Charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

A federal grand jury on Wednesday indicted former Kansas City Chiefs running back Bam Morris and two associates on drug and money laundering charges.

Morris, 28, Dewayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 22 of Warrensburg, Mo., are charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute at least 220 pounds of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, according to the indictment.

Morris and Bryant also were charged with one count of distribution of marijuana and Myers with one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana, Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said.

Oliver said Wednesday's charges replace a one-count criminal complaint that had charged the three with conspiracy to distribute more than 220 pounds of marijuana.

Wednesday's indictments resulted from an investigation by the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service. Morris, Bryant and Myers are accused of conspiring with others since at least January 1998 to distribute marijuana in western Missouri and elsewhere.

Morris and Bryant are being held without bond, while Myers is free on bond pending further court appearances. If convicted on all counts, the three could be sentenced to a maximum of 40 years in prison without parole and up to $3.5 million in fines.

Morris, who retired from the Chiefs at the end of the 1999 season, was on probation for a marijuana conviction in Texas when he was arrested in Kansas City. Texas authorities have issued an arrest warrant for violating terms of the probation.

Morris, who pleaded innocent to the earlier complaint, was denied bond last month by U.S. Magistrate Judge John T. Maughmer.

''I don't have any particular confidence you will follow my conditions (of release) any more than you've followed the conditions from Texas,'' Maughmer said in denying bond.

Morris' participation was allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick return specialist Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who is cooperating with the investigation after pleading guilty to his role in selling a stolen car, was cut by the Chiefs after it was revealed that he admitted to an FBI agent that he gave $40,000 to Morris to buy drugs.

Morris' attorney, William Rork, said last month that the charges against Morris were based solely on the words of Vanover and his personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns, who has also been charged in the case.

An affidavit filed earlier this year in connection with drug charges against Burns refers to Morris, stating that he was a passenger in a vehicle that was found to have marijuana residue in it after it left Vanover's driveway. His agent said then that Morris was ''an innocent party.''

The Baltimore Ravens signed Morris in September 1996, but he was suspended for four games for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.

He also was suspended for the first four games of the 1997 season after an offseason NFL test revealed he had used alcohol. When he missed several meetings with his probation officer, he was sentenced to four months in jail. Morris was released by Baltimore after his sentencing.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: May 10, 2000


24 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

May 10, 2000, Wednesday, AM cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 519 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs running back indicted on additional drug charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

A federal grand jury on Wednesday indicted former Kansas City Chiefs running back Bam Morris and two associates on drug and money laundering charges.

Morris, 28, Dewayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 22 of Warrensburg, Mo., are charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute at least 220 pounds of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, according to the indictment.

Morris and Bryant also were charged with one count of distribution of marijuana and Myers with one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana, Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said.

Oliver said Wednesday's charges replace a one-count criminal complaint that had charged the three with conspiracy to distribute more than 220 pounds of marijuana.

Wednesday's indictments resulted from an investigation by the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service. Morris, Bryant and Myers are accused of conspiring with others since at least January 1998 to distribute marijuana in western Missouri and elsewhere.

Morris and Bryant are being held without bond, while Myers is free on bond pending further court appearances. If convicted on all counts, the three could be sentenced to a maximum of 40 years in prison without parole and up to $3.5 million in fines.

Morris, who retired from the Chiefs at the end of the 1999 season, was on probation for a marijuana conviction in Texas when he was arrested in Kansas City. Texas authorities have issued an arrest warrant for violating terms of the probation.

Morris, who pleaded innocent to the earlier complaint, was denied bond last month by U.S. Magistrate Judge John T. Maughmer.

"I don't have any particular confidence you will follow my conditions (of release) any more than you've followed the conditions from Texas," Maughmer said in denying bond.

Morris' participation was allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick return specialist Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who is cooperating with the investigation after pleading guilty to his role in selling a stolen car, was cut by the Chiefs after it was revealed that he admitted to an FBI agent that he gave $40,000 to Morris to buy drugs.

Morris' attorney, William Rork, said last month that the charges against Morris were based solely on the words of Vanover and his personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns, who has also been charged in the case.

An affidavit filed earlier this year in connection with drug charges against Burns refers to Morris, stating that he was a passenger in a vehicle that was found to have marijuana residue in it after it left Vanover's driveway. His agent said then that Morris was "an innocent party."

The Baltimore Ravens signed Morris in September 1996, but he was suspended for four games for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.

He also was suspended for the first four games of the 1997 season after an offseason NFL test revealed he had used alcohol. When he missed several meetings with his probation officer, he was sentenced to four months in jail. Morris was released by Baltimore after his sentencing.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: May 11, 2000


25 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

May 10, 2000, Wednesday, AM cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 519 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs running back indicted on additional drug charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

A federal grand jury on Wednesday indicted former Kansas City Chiefs running back Bam Morris and two associates on drug and money laundering charges.

Morris, 28, Dewayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 22 of Warrensburg, Mo., are charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute at least 220 pounds of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, according to the indictment.

Morris and Bryant also were charged with one count of distribution of marijuana and Myers with one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana, Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said.

Oliver said Wednesday's charges replace a one-count criminal complaint that had charged the three with conspiracy to distribute more than 220 pounds of marijuana.

Wednesday's indictments resulted from an investigation by the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service. Morris, Bryant and Myers are accused of conspiring with others since at least January 1998 to distribute marijuana in western Missouri and elsewhere.

Morris and Bryant are being held without bond, while Myers is free on bond pending further court appearances. If convicted on all counts, the three could be sentenced to a maximum of 40 years in prison without parole and up to $3.5 million in fines.

Morris, who retired from the Chiefs at the end of the 1999 season, was on probation for a marijuana conviction in Texas when he was arrested in Kansas City. Texas authorities have issued an arrest warrant for violating terms of the probation.

Morris, who pleaded innocent to the earlier complaint, was denied bond last month by U.S. Magistrate Judge John T. Maughmer.

"I don't have any particular confidence you will follow my conditions (of release) any more than you've followed the conditions from Texas," Maughmer said in denying bond.

Morris' participation was allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick return specialist Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who is cooperating with the investigation after pleading guilty to his role in selling a stolen car, was cut by the Chiefs after it was revealed that he admitted to an FBI agent that he gave $40,000 to Morris to buy drugs.

Morris' attorney, William Rork, said last month that the charges against Morris were based solely on the words of Vanover and his personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns, who has also been charged in the case.

An affidavit filed earlier this year in connection with drug charges against Burns refers to Morris, stating that he was a passenger in a vehicle that was found to have marijuana residue in it after it left Vanover's driveway. His agent said then that Morris was "an innocent party."

The Baltimore Ravens signed Morris in September 1996, but he was suspended for four games for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.

He also was suspended for the first four games of the 1997 season after an offseason NFL test revealed he had used alcohol. When he missed several meetings with his probation officer, he was sentenced to four months in jail. Morris was released by Baltimore after his sentencing.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: May 11, 2000


26 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

May 10, 2000, Wednesday, AM cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 521 words

HEADLINE: Former Texas Tech running back indicted on additional drug charges

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

A federal grand jury on Wednesday indicted former Kansas City Chiefs and Texas Tech running back Bam Morris and two associates on drug and money laundering charges.

Morris, 28, Dewayne Calvin Bryant, 28, of Dallas, and Robert Corey Myers, 22 of Warrensburg, Mo., are charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute at least 220 pounds of marijuana and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, according to the indictment.

Morris and Bryant also were charged with one count of distribution of marijuana and Myers with one count of possession with intent to distribute marijuana, Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Oliver said.

Oliver said Wednesday's charges replace a one-count criminal complaint that had charged the three with conspiracy to distribute more than 220 pounds of marijuana.

Wednesday's indictments resulted from an investigation by the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service. Morris, Bryant and Myers are accused of conspiring with others since at least January 1998 to distribute marijuana in western Missouri and elsewhere.

Morris and Bryant are being held without bond, while Myers is free on bond pending further court appearances. If convicted on all counts, the three could be sentenced to a maximum of 40 years in prison without parole and up to $3.5 million in fines.

Morris, who retired from the Chiefs at the end of the 1999 season, was on probation for a marijuana conviction in Texas when he was arrested in Kansas City. Texas authorities have issued an arrest warrant for violating terms of the probation.

Morris, who pleaded innocent to the earlier complaint, was denied bond last month by U.S. Magistrate Judge John T. Maughmer.

"I don't have any particular confidence you will follow my conditions (of release) any more than you've followed the conditions from Texas," Maughmer said in denying bond.

Morris' participation was allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick return specialist Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who is cooperating with the investigation after pleading guilty to his role in selling a stolen car, was cut by the Chiefs after it was revealed that he admitted to an FBI agent that he gave $40,000 to Morris to buy drugs.

Morris' attorney, William Rork, said last month that the charges against Morris were based solely on the words of Vanover and his personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns. Burns also has been charged in the case.

An affidavit filed earlier this year in connection with drug charges against Burns refers to Morris, stating that he was a passenger in a vehicle that was found to have marijuana residue in it after it left Vanover's driveway. His agent said then that Morris was "an innocent party."

The Baltimore Ravens signed Morris in September 1996, but he was suspended for four games for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.

He also was suspended for the first four games of the 1997 season after an offseason NFL test revealed he had used alcohol. When he missed several meetings with his probation officer, he was sentenced to four months in jail. Morris was released by Baltimore after his sentencing.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: May 11, 2000


27 of 28 DOCUMENTS

The Associated Press State & Local Wire

 

The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The Associated Press.

April 20, 2000, Thursday, AM cycle

SECTION: Sports News

LENGTH: 229 words

HEADLINE: Former Chiefs running back denied bond in drug case

DATELINE: KANSAS CITY, Mo.

BODY:

Former Kansas City Chiefs running back Bam Morris was denied bond Wednesday on charges he trafficked in marijuana.

Morris was ordered held until his trial by a judge who said he did not trust Morris to follow the conditions of release.

Morris was on probation for a marijuana conviction in Texas at the time he was arrested in Kansas City. Texas authorities have issued an arrest warrant for violating terms of the probation.

"I don't have any particular confidence you will follow my conditions (of release) any more than you've followed the conditions from Texas," U.S. Magistrate Judge John T. Maughmer said in denying bond.

Morris, who retired at the end of the season, had pleaded innocent to federal charges.

The federal indictment alleged a wide-ranging ring in which marijuana was imported into Missouri and Kansas from Mexico, Texas and California.

Morris' participation was allegedly financed by former Chiefs kick return specialist Tamarick Vanover. Vanover, who is cooperating with the investigation after pleading guilty to his role in selling a stolen car, was cut by the Chiefs after the allegation that he gave $40,000 to Morris to buy drugs.

Morris' attorney, William Rork, said the charges against Morris were based solely on the words of Vanover and his personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns. Burns is also charged in the case.

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

LOAD-DATE: April 21, 2000


28 of 28 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2000 The Kansas City Star Co.

THE KANSAS CITY STAR

April 20, 2000, Thursday METROPOLITAN EDITION

SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. D1

LENGTH: 311 words

HEADLINE: Morris denied bond;
Judge notes he was on probation when arrested

BYLINE: MARK MORRIS; The Kansas City Star

BODY:

Former Chiefs running back Bam Morris will remain in custody
until his trial on a marijuana-trafficking charge, a federal judge
ruled Wednesday.

Chief U.S. Magistrate John T. Maughmer noted in denying bond for
Morris that his arrest last week in the marijuana case occurred while
he already was on probation from a Texas drug conviction.

"I don't have any particular confidence you will follow my
conditions (of release) any more than you've followed the conditions
from Texas," Maughmer said.

Texas authorities issued an arrest warrant for a probation
violation charge last week. Should he be convicted of the Texas
probation violation, Morris faces a 10-year sentence there, Maughmer
noted.

Morris pleaded not guilty to the federal charge. His attorney,
William Rork, said afterward that he had no plans to appeal
Maughmer's bond decision and said he hopes the case moves quickly to
trial.

"We welcome the opportunity for a jury to review the evidence in
this case," Rork said.

Last week prosecutors accused Morris and two other men of
operating a marijuana-trafficking ring financed, in part, by Chiefs
kick returner Tamarick Vanover.

Vanover, who already has pleaded guilty to a federal stolen-car
charge, was cut from the team soon after the allegations against
Morris were unsealed.

At Wednesday's hearing, Rork argued that the allegations against
Morris rest almost entirely on the words of Vanover and his former
personal assistant, Gregory D. Burns, who also faces drug-trafficking
charges. Both now are cooperating with authorities.

Though Morris will remain in federal custody, Maughmer did allow
a co-defendant in the case, Robert Corey Myers, to be released on
bond. A third defendant, Dewayne Calvin Bryant, remains in custody in
Texas.
@ART CAPTION:Morris
@ART:Photo (color)

LOAD-DATE: April 20, 2000